Educational & interesting reading


A long-overdue book honouring the remarkable achievements of key black British individuals over many centuries, in collaboration with the 100 Great Black Britons campaign founded and run by Patrick Vernon OBE

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Do you remember the Real McCoy’s comedy sketch about the Caribbean restaurant? A man tries to buy ackee ‘n’ saltfish with two dumplings and is scolded for his audacity to expect what is standard customer service—like being spoken to respectfully, getting what is advertised on the menu and at-the-table waitress service. It’s extremely exaggerated but belly-bustlingly funny because many of us recognise similar scenarios from our own experience with ‘patty shops’.

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Selina Flavius is a London-based Senior Account Exec who created and runs the coaching platform Black Girl Finance. A conversation with a colleague about investing and financial goals prompted Selina to research how women of colour fare when it comes to their money and finances - and, after reading the ethnicity pay gap statistics, was determined to help women start thriving financially.

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Stirring and provocative, How to be an Antiracist skewers smug self-satisfaction about liberal credentials by stating that we are all complicit in racist incidents. Only by assertive ‘antiracism’ can such appalling abuse and attack begin to be curbed. An incendiary polemic from an acknowledged authority on the subject.

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How the West Indian Child is made Educationally Sub-normal in the British School System (1971) Bernard Coard’s polemical pamphlet, addressed directly to black parents, set out the “scandal of the Black Child in Schools in Britain”. The book was published by New Beacon for the Caribbean Education and Community Workers’ Association (CECWA).

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The measure of a man is what he does with power. The measure of a man is not necessarily his title or his position, but rather how he treats others. If you want to see the true measure of a man, watch how he treats his inferiors, not his equals.

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Very inspiring. Malcom X was not like people said he was. This was a man who wanted justice, rights and peace for his black brothers and sisters. He was not a man who thought killing was always the answer. This man was intelligent, wise and understood the circle we call life.

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The two essays were first respectively published in American magazines in late 1962: "Letter from a Region of My Mind" in The New Yorker,[3] and "My Dungeon Shook" in The Progressive.[4] They were then combined and published in book form in 1963 by Dial Press, and in 1964 in Britain by Penguin Books. Critics greeted the book enthusiastically; it is considered, by some, as one of the most influential books about race relations in the 1960s.[5] It was released in an audiobook format in 2008, narrated by Jesse L. Martin.

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The Souls of Black Folk is a classic work of American literature by W. E. B. Du Bois. It is a seminal work in the history of sociology, and a cornerstone of African-American literary history. To develop this groundbreaking work, Du Bois drew from his own experiences as an African-American in the American society. Outside of its notable relevance in African-American history, The Souls of Black Folk also holds an important place in social science as one of the early works in the field of sociology.

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Unlike the King James Bible, which contains 66 books, the Ethiopic Bible comprises a total of 84 books and includes some writings that were rejected or lost by other Churches.

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The Original African Heritage Study Bible offers many unique features which reveal the African/Edenic contribution to Judaism and Christianity.

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As part of my mission to popularise Black or African history, it is clear that the premier book on that history, When We Ruled, needs an equally premier learning resource.

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